4245-0

Dessert Plate (Imari)

There was a great demand for Oriental patterns in the second half of the 18th century. The lavishly decorated Japanese, or Imari pattern was introduced at Derby factory in 1775. Imari is actually a harbour in the Hizen province of Japan, but in Europe it has become the trade name of a ware with a colourful stylized floral design, mainly in an underglaze cobalt blue with an overglaze of iron red and occasionally green enamels.

During the Bloor period, the lustrous Imari design gained a tremendous popularity still enjoyed today. It has become another characteristic feature of the Derby factory.

Image from: Derby Museum and Art Gallery



Continue browsing this section

2007-0Derby Porcelain in the 18th and early 19th centuries 2878-0Derby Porcelain: André Planche and William Duesbury 4599-0Derby Porcelain: William Duesbury II and Robert Bloor 4222-0Pastoral Group, c.1770 4239-0Candelabrum, c. 1755-60 4234-0The Four Quarters (Continents), c.1775 4220-0Tithe Pig Group, c.1765-70 4238-0The “Welsh” Tailor, c.1770 4240-0James Quin as Falstaff, c. 1825 4233-0Edmund Kean as Richard III, c.1815 4225-0Virgins Awakening Cupid, c.1780 4221-0Frill Vase and Cover, c.1760 4244-0Blue & White Table Centre in two parts, c.1760 4228-0Ice Pail, c.1796-1800 4229-0Pot-Pourri, c.1800-1810 4235-0William Pegg’s Thistle Dish, c.1800 4230-0Dish, c.1800 4236-0Dessert Plate, c.1813-1820 4223-0William Billingsley’s Prentice Plate, 1790-1795 4224-0Dessert Dish, c.1790 4237-0A Dessert Plate from the Trotter Service, c.1825 4245-0Dessert Plate (Imari) 4226-0Coffee Can, c.1793-4 4232-0Teapot, c.1795 4231-0Teapot, c.1795 4243-0Chocolate Mug with Cover, c.1800